Tag Archives: Roman

Crunch Time for the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal – Just 48 Hours to Go!

Ok folks, it’s crunch time for the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal. In less than 48 hours, the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet will go under the auctioneers hammer at Christie’s in London. You can Donate online to the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal or you can get in touch with Tullie House Museum directly right here.

The total on the Just Giving web site now stands at £7,641.22 plus £1,954.96 Gift Aid plus supplement, lets see if we can get that total up even higher in the next 48 hours. So go and Donate online to the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal right now!

I don’t know how much Tullie House Museum has raised in offline donations, I couldn’t find any mention on their website.

Book on the Frome Hoard to be Released on October 11

The British Museum is releasing a book on the Frome Hoard!

Found in April 2010 by metal detectorist Dave Crisp, the Frome Hoard consisted of a very large roman pot filled to the brim with 52,503 Roman coins. The coins in the pot weighed around 160 kilograms (that’s 352.7lbs in old money), one of the largest coin hoards ever discovered! The coins are mostly third century radiates, some of them in a remarkable state of preservation. The book, titled simply ‘The Frome Hoard’, will be released on the 11th October 2010.

Denarius from the Frome HoardAbove: A Denarius of Carausius from the Frome Hoard. Photo courtesy of the Portable Antiquities Scheme’s Flickr photostream.

Another interesting point to note is that the British Museum still needs around £30,000 for conservation work on the coins, and 50p from every sale of the Frome Hoard book goes towards the cost of conserving the coins and the acquisition campaign apparently being run by Somerset County Heritage Service so that the hoard can stay in Somerset and be displayed in Taunton Museum.

I’ll provide some more information on the book and probably a review when I receive my copy.

The Frome Hoard by Sam Moorhead, Anna Booth and Roger Bland on Amazon.co.uk

Lecture on the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet at Kendal Museum

The Westmorland Gazzette reports that there will be a lecture on the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet held at Kendal Museum on October 1st at 19:30. To book a seat call the Kendal Museum on 01539 815597 or email info@kendal.ac.uk.

You can donate online to the Crosby Garrett Helmet Appeal here: http://www.justgiving.com/Tullie-House-Crosby-Garrett-Roman-Helmet-Appeal

Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Latest News

The BBC is reporting that an anonymous donor has not only pledged £50,000 to the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal, but has promised to match every contribution to Tullie House Museum’s appeal fund pound for pound. No reports, as yet, on whether the appeal will receive money from those high-profile arts and archaeology funds mentioned in an earlier blog.

More on the donation from the Granuid.

The Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet now has an Wikipedia article.

You can donate online to the Crosby Garrett Helmet Appeal here: http://www.justgiving.com/Tullie-House-Crosby-Garrett-Roman-Helmet-Appeal

The Westmorland Gazette Reports on Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal

The Westmorland Gazette has posted a story on the fundraising effort to keep the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet in Cumbria. The Westmorland Gazette reports that, so far, the public have donated £25,000 towards the appeal fund and that staff at the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery expect a large boost to the campaign fund “from high-profile arts and archaeology funds later this week.”

In the wake of the massive public interest in major metal detecting finds like the Staffordshire Hoard and the Frome Hoard, I had expected a greater level of interest in the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet from the general public. The £25,000 raised so far was a big surprised to me, I had hoped for a whole lot more after all the publicity and news coverage the helmet received.

No doubt the massive cuts to public spending and the threat of mass job losses have had an impact on peoples willingness to donate to any cause, but even in the current financial climate, I had hoped we could do better.

So it seems, for now at least, that the fate of the Crosby Garrett Helmet lays with those “high-profile arts and archaeology funds”. I hope that those who decide how the money in those funds gets spent will support Tullie House and provide them with the money they need to acquire the Crosby Garrett Helmet, not just for the people of Cumbria, but for everyone in the whole of Britain.

Photographing metal detecting finds with a cheap digital microscope, Part II

A couple more shots with the cheap, perhaps too cheap, digital microscope. Roman coin of Gallienus:Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus - 218 – 268Roman coins picturing mythical creatures are among my favourite finds, so I’m glad this one came out pretty well!Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus - 218 – 268Not bad!

Now for a hammered silver:

Hammered Silver photographed with a cheap digital microscopeHammered Silver photographed with a cheap digital microscopeNot bad going! I was searching around on the web last night and found that Lindner (the coin and stamp storage box people) make a digital microscope that is similar in design to the one I am using but looks a lot better made, not to mention being a lot more expensive. Might be worth trying out some time!

Update: I’ve just heard from The Searcher Magazine that they reviewed the Lindner digital microscope in the August 2008 issue, on page 20.

Photographing metal detecting finds with a cheap digital microscope

I’ve been messing around with a cheap digital microscope to see how useful it would be for photographing metal detecting finds:

PLON - London mint of ConstantineCoin of Crispus minted in London, pretty blurry.
Flavius Magnus Magnentius coin with very early roman christian iconographyCoin of Magnentius with very early roman christian iconography.

The picture of the coin of Magnentius isn’t too bad, I think I need to work on my focusing. One of the problems with the digital microscope I am using is that it is very difficult to focus the thing without moving it, which means you have to focus it again. Maybe practise makes perfect?

Although I made sure that the microscope would work with Windows 7 when I bought it, the microscope software is clearly not fully compatible with Microsoft’s latest operating system as the software window does not display properly, rendering some of the microscopes functions unusable.

Even with my poor job of focusing, it is clear that the image quality will never match that of a half decent digital camera. Maybe the more expensive digital microscopes can produce better quality images, I’ll have to see if I can borrow one from somewhere and find out.

Although I am going to continue messing around with this digital microscope, it doesn’t seem that it will be all that good for finds, it is a lot of fun to play with though!

Maybe I can get better images out of it once I am more familiar with it, or can find a software upgrade that will make the microscope fully compatible with windows 7!

More pictures tomorrow if I get time!

And all this messing around with digital microscopes reminds me that I need to get the guide to photographing coins and artifacts pages done for the main web site!

How to donate to the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal

I just received a reply from the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery about how to donate to the Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal:

“People can phone and pledge their donation on 01228 618743 or they can fill the attached donation form and send it back with their preferred method of payment.”

Download the donation form here: Donation form – gift aid (word document) right click and save. You can donate by credit and debit card using this form. No mention of Paypal or any online payment methods though.

Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet Appeal

Tullie House launches urgent appeal to keep Crosby Garrett Roman Helmet in Cumbria

From: http://www.tulliehouse.co.uk/romanhelmetappeal [Link now dead]

“Please help us to keep this signifcant find in Cumbria. See the images below.

Pledge your support by phoning Tullie House on 01228 618743 or join our Tullie House facebook group

Tullie House launches urgent appeal to keep rare Roman Helmet in Cumbria

A Roman helmet of national significance, found locally in Crosby Garrett, North Cumbria, will be auctioned on 7th October. Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery is launching an urgent public and corporate appeal to help to secure this exceptionally rare Roman Cavalry Parade Helmet, dating from the end of the 1st to mid 3rd century AD, as a centrepiece for its new £1.5m Roman Frontier: stories beyond Hadrian’s Wall gallery, due to open summer 2011.

There are only two other comparable helmets known in the UK and neither of these is as complete or elaborate as the Cumbrian example that is a Roman copper-alloy two-piece face mask visor helmet. This type of mask is characterised by idealised (Greek) youthful male faces, mostly clean-shaven, with luxuriant curly and wavy hair.

According to an extract in the diary of Flavius Arranius, 136AD, ‘those of high rank or superior horsemanship wear gilded helmets to draw attention of the spectators. Unlike helmets made for active service, they are made to fit all round the faces of the riders with apertures for the eyes.’

Tullie House’s archaeology collections are extensive with a particularly important collection of Roman Cumbria material, especially from Carlisle and the Hadrian’s Wall area. In the development of its collections Tullie House prioritises artefacts that are judged to be of high importance to the local heritage and to ensure that items remain or are returned to Cumbria.

Tullie House needs to raise between £300-400,000to secure this major Roman artefact and is launching an urgent public and corporate appeal to encourage individuals and businesses to pledge their support now to keep the Cumbrian Roman Helmet in Cumbria.”

Please support this effort if you are able!