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Metal Detecting News / 500-year-old Gold coin found by an amateur treasure hunter
« Last post by Tascio on November 18, 2017, 03:49:12 PM »
500-year-old coin that may have been dropped by one of Richard III's soldiers fleeing the Battle of Bosworth Field is found by an amateur treasure hunter

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5092541/500-year-old-coin-amateur-treasure-hunter.html

An amateur metal detector struck gold when she stumbled across a rare 500-year-old coin near one of England's most historic battlefields.

The coin, minted during the doomed reign of King Richard III, is one of only a handful still in existence.

Experts speculate the gold coin may have been dropped by one of Richard's soldiers fleeing the pivotal Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.

Richard III was killed in the battle and his opponent, Henry Tudor, seized the throne to begin the Tudor dynasty.

Michelle Vall, from Blackpool, was detecting close to Bosworth Field when she dug up the old coin called a half angel. 

It is now set fetch £15,000 ($20,000) at Dix Noonan Webb's auction of coins, historical medals and paper money on 13 December.

Ms Vall, 51, made the rare discovery in Monks Kirby, Warwickshire, during a charity detecting rally in  September.

The teaching assistant said: 'After detecting for two and a half hours in a farmer's field I got a signal.

'The coin was deep down, about 16 inches below the surface, and the soil there is thick clay so it took a bit of digging out.

'I spotted this glint of gold in the hole, although I obviously did not know exactly what it was at first.

'I put it in the palm of my hand and then I went back to the organiser's tent. One of them identified it and people became very excited.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5092541/500-year-old-coin-amateur-treasure-hunter.html
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Metal Detecting News / Richard III rare coin found near historic Battle of Bosworth site
« Last post by Tascio on November 17, 2017, 03:12:15 PM »
Richard III rare coin found near historic Battle of Bosworth site

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/news/leicester-news/richard-iii-rare-coin-found-788233

A metal detectorist has tracked down a rare gold coin from Richard III's reign near to the site of the Battle of Bosworth.

The Half Angel is one of just a handful of such coins that have survived from the king's two-year reign.

It was discovered by Michelle Vall while she was taking part in a charity detecting rally in September at Monks Kirby, near the Bosworth Field. News of the discovery has just come to light.

The coin will be auctioned international coins, medals and jewellery specialist Dix Noonan Webb in London on December 13. It is expected to fetch up to £15,000.

Christopher Webb, head of the coins department at Dix Noonan Webb, said: "This is a very rare discovery that has miraculously survived in a field for more than five centuries.

“Its importance as a coin is enhanced by the tantalising possibility that it may have belonged to one of Richard’s army, whose defeat at Bosworth ended the Wars of the Roses and ushered in the Tudor dynasty."

Michelle, a 51-year-old primary school teaching assistant, from Blackpool, said: “After detecting for two-and-a-half hours in a farmer’s field, I got a signal.

“The coin was deep down, about 16 inches below the surface, and the soil there is thick clay so it took a bit of digging out.
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Rare gold coin found in field near Rugby expected to sell for up to £15,000 at auction

http://www.rugbyadvertiser.co.uk/news/rare-gold-coin-found-in-field-near-rugby-expected-to-sell-for-up-to-15-000-at-auction-1-8250201

A rare gold coin dating from the brief reign of Richard III has been found by a metal detectorist just a few miles from Bosworth Field where the king famously met his death in combat in 1485.

It is possible that the Half Angel discovered by Michelle Vall from Blackpool at Monks Kirby near Rugby may have belonged to one of Richard’s soldiers fleeing from the battle that changed the course of English history.

The Half Angel, one of just a handful surviving from Richard’s two-year reign, is to be auctioned by Dix Noonan Webb, the international coins, medals and jewellery specialists, in London on December 13. It is expected to fetch up to £15,000 in the auction of coins, historical medals and paper money. “This is a very rare discovery that has miraculously survived in a Warwickshire field for more than five centuries,” said Christopher Webb, head of the coins department at Dix Noonan Webb. “Its importance as a coin is enhanced by the tantalising possibility that it may have belonged to one of Richard’s army whose defeat at Bosworth ended the Wars of the Roses and ushered in the Tudor dynasty.”

Read more at: http://www.rugbyadvertiser.co.uk/news/rare-gold-coin-found-in-field-near-rugby-expected-to-sell-for-up-to-15-000-at-auction-1-8250201
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Schoolboy finds 6,000-year-old bison horn while metal detecting on a Sussex beach

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4928722/schoolboy-finds-bison-horn-sussex-beach-6000-years-old/

A LAD was stunned when a huge fossil he discovered on the beach turned out to be a 6,000-year-old bison horn.

Archie Wood, 13, thought he had unearthed a mammoth tusk when he was metal detecting on Bexhill Beach in East Sussex.

His family called in experts to get to the bottom of the incredible find and discovered it probably belonged to a prehistoric Bos Bison - more commonly known as an American buffalo.

Archie's grandad Neil Wood said: "He was so excited, he couldn't believe what he was digging up.

"He saw it sticking out the sand. He pulled out this enormous tusk."

Archie and Neil took a photo of the fossil to the Isle of Wight and saw an expert called "Jurassic Jim" who confirmed it was a Bos Bison.
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Metal Detecting News / Centuries-old arquebus ball found in Jersey
« Last post by Tascio on November 15, 2017, 03:29:12 PM »
Centuries-old arquebus ball found in Jersey

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2017/11/03/metal-detectorist-finds-centuries-old-arquebus-ball/

A RARE arquebus ball, a projectile which was used from the 1400s to penetrate plate armour, has been found by a metal detectorist in a field in St Brelade.

The lead ball, which is over an inch wide, is believed to be one of the biggest and heaviest such shots ever found in the Island.

It would have been fired from an arquebus, a form of long gun which began to be used in Europe from the early 15th century.


Read more at https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2017/11/03/metal-detectorist-finds-centuries-old-arquebus-ball/
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Metal Detecting News / Derry man organizes field hunt for those who love metal detecting
« Last post by Tascio on November 14, 2017, 01:59:52 PM »
Derry man organizes field hunt for those who love metal detecting

http://www.eagletribune.com/news/new_hampshire/treasure-hunt-derry-man-organizes-field-hunt-for-those-who/article_44643a8a-87a6-56c5-9ecd-5e07400cd0e8.html

DERRY — He's on the hunt and wants to share that search with others.

Mike Bissonnette wants to find out more about the land he calls his home — and he has the metal detector to prove it.

His simple detector helps the Derry man discover metal trinkets, buttons, coins and buckles lying inches below the surface.

On a recent sunny fall morning, Bissonnette led a searching brigade that drew dozens of metal detecting fans from all over New England to J & F Farms in Derry for a treasure hunt.

He put out the call on social media, inviting metal detectors to come to Derry for the autumn hunt.

Metal detecting has been Bissonnette's hobby for several years. It has allowed him to recover interesting items that might mean something to those local history buffs.

Several years ago, Bissonnette donated a French coin to the Derry History Museum. The coin dated back to the 1650s.

In Derry, finding a rare coin or a metal bit of the past is surprisingly easy, Bissonnette said. He has done detecting searches near First Parish Church in East Derry that will be the focal point of the Nutfield 300th anniversary in 2019.

He often finds old belt buckles or button, possible remnants of a coat left behind by a colonial farmer.

For the farm event, Bissonnette and his son spent several hours "seeding" the fields and hiding hundreds of trinkets and treasures prior to the Saturday morning search.

That could be a rare coin, button or other gemstone, or ring. Hidden under the ground were also relics, arrowheads, thimbles, skeleton keys, bracelets, and other items dating back generations.

"A lot of people like to find old buttons, old coins," Bissonnette said.

Those who love to dig and search are like family, Bissonnette said. People share their finds and offer tips for others just getting started.

Specialty hunts are planned by the metal detecting network where people gather to enjoy the day while seeing what they may unearth in various regions.

It wasn't just the adults enjoying the hunt.

Bissonnette said he always prepares a special field for the younger detecting fans to enjoy. This year he hid a treasure trove for children to find.

Sheila Bedi traveled to Derry from Vermont and was scouring one part of the field with daughter Stella, 9, also a big fan of metal detectors.

Bedi, 49, said she has loved the hobby since she was 17.

For Stella, the morning hunt was paying off.

"I found a treasure chest in the first hole," she announced.

Some hunters wore head sets to keep the pinging sounds of detecting away from those searching nearby. It was a silent expedition for the most part on the farm fields while people swung the slender detectors back and forth. If a find registered, the person then knelt down to start the meticulous digging and uncovering of the dirt, leading them down five or six inches to the exact spot.

Bissonnette said his searches have taken him to fields, woods and a path along a riverbank. There could be a centuries-old musket shell or a piece of jewelry just waiting to be found. Old cellar holes are exceptionally ripe for recovery, Bissonnette said.

He always asks permission before hunting on private property. If he finds something substantial, he often gives it to the homeowner as a thank-you for allowing him to wander.

Metal detecting is a hobby, a sport of sorts, and something Bissonnette said keeps him connected to the rich history of this area.

"It's part of keeping bits of history," he said. "People are proud of what they find. They love colonial stuff and Derry is a colonial town."

Bissonnette said he loves to share his hobby.

"You don't do it for the money, you do it for the passion of the hobby," he said, "and the history."
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Metal Detecting News / WWII Veteran Reunited With Dog Tag He Lost 70 Years Ago
« Last post by Tascio on November 12, 2017, 03:27:07 PM »
WWII Veteran Reunited With Dog Tag He Lost 70 Years Ago

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2017/11/10/world-war-ii-veteran-dog-tags-found/

BOSTON (CBS) – What once was lost, 70 long years ago, is finally found.

A Chelmsford World War II veteran has gotten back something he never thought he’d see again.

Bill Ledwell, 92 years old, lost his dog tag from when he served as a sailor in the Pacific during World War II.

Thanks to a man with a metal detector and some amateur sleuthing, Ledwell has the perfect way to celebrate Veterans Day.

“Amazing. It really is amazing,” Ledwell said. “It brings back memories, that’s what it does.”

Ledwell lost his dog tags in 1947 when he was in Green Cove Springs, Florida, mothballing ships after the war.

That’s where Frank Haggard comes in.

The Vietnam veteran lives in Green Cove and was using his metal detector one day at a river that was at low tide. Bingo. He found the dog tag, and then he found Bill.

“We sent it on a Friday and he called me up Saturday morning. He says, ‘I got my dog tag around my neck, back where it belongs,’” Haggard told WBZ-TV.
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A metal detectorist makes a living helping Chicagoans find lost jewelry

https://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/a-metal-detectorist-makes-a-living-helping-chicagoans-find-lost-jewelry/Content?oid=34140683

“Seventy percent of my calls are ‘ring tosses,’ where the spouse throws a ring in anger,” Jim Evans says.

Chicagoans is a first-person account from off the beaten track, as told to Anne Ford. This week's Chicagoan is Jim Evans, 76, the metal detectorist.

I get paid to find people's jewelry. I got a call to look for a guy's high school ring that he lost 42 years ago in his grandfather's backyard. He told me, "I can remember the day like it was yesterday. I had just bought my first brand-new car, a green Pinto, and I was washing it. I got soap on my hand, and I flipped my hand, and the ring went sailing. I looked for that ring for three days and couldn't find it." The grandfather's house ended up being sold, and the new owner wouldn't allow him to look. Forty-two years later, the house comes up for sale again. He calls the new owner. She gives him permission. I found it for him in 15 minutes. It was about six inches down in the soil, and there was a little root starting to grow on it.

Seventy percent of my calls are what I refer to as "ring tosses." That's where the spouse throws a ring in anger. It's amazing to me. Why not throw a plate? Why a ring? I never ask why the ring was tossed. It might be adultery. I don't know, and I don't really care.

Sometimes they lie about it. I had a lady call me and say, "I dropped my ring on my porch." Well, I found her ring 35 feet off the porch, so it must have been a little windy when she dropped it. Another lady called me a couple of weeks ago saying, "I lost my diamond stud earring." I told her, "Bring me the other one, 'cause I'm gonna need to figure out if my detector can even pick it up, since there's not much metal on it." She said, "Actually, I threw that one too."

Fall is a prime season, because people will be raking leaves, throwing leaves. Winter, when there's snow, that becomes busy. Guys wiping snow off their car, their fingers shrink, they lose their rings. And then in the summertime, people go to the beach and lose their rings. They go in the water, their fingers shrink. Or they put the ring in their shoe, and it starts to rain, and they grab their stuff and start running, and they drop the ring.
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Metal detector group discover treasure dating back to 13th century

http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/News/15610085.Metal_detector_group_discover_treasure_dating_back_to_13th_century/

A METAL detecting group discovered 29 historical coins dating back to the 13th century on a farn.

The Hyndburn and Ribble Valley Metal Detecting Club, which has been running for about 18 months, discovered the haul at a farm in Sawley.

Some of the coins date from Roman Times, the Bronze Age and Medieval era. and included Edward 1 pennies dating back to between 1272 and 1307.

Metal detectorist John Ward was credited with finding the first coin. He was then joined by the rest of the team who unearthed the treasure.

Fellow member Andrew Smith, 46, Henthorn Road, Clitheroe, said: “It’s the fact we discovered 29 in the field that made this so unusual and unique.

“I was shocked because we had been doing it for so long.

“We found one and then another one and another one.

“This kept going on throughout the day.

“It was surreal."
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Metal Detecting News / Treasure hunter Dave finds unexploded bomb
« Last post by Tascio on November 09, 2017, 02:41:20 PM »
Treasure hunter Dave finds unexploded bomb

http://www.echo-news.co.uk/news/15616925.Treasure_hunter_Dave_finds_unexploded_bomb/

A COUPLE had the shock of their lives when they discovered a bomb during a metal detecting trip.

David Lovey, 48, of Warren Drive, Basildon, was on a treasure hunting expedition with his wife, Kat, in a field in Pitsea.

As they were searching, the metal detector picked up signals of a mysterious object hidden underneath the surface.

David, thinking he had found a good haul, dug the ground up and discovered a worn-out looking object which he thought was an was an old pipe.

He said: “I dug about seven inches into the ground and I saw the metal object. I dug around it, and further into the ground and the object looked very familiar to me.”

But actually David had found a Second World War 1kg bomb just inches away from him.

He added: “I’ve been doing metal detecting for almost three years.

“I’ve uncovered bomb fragments and shells before but I’ve never found a whole one until last Sunday.

“It was an eventful day for Kat and I. I must admit I wasn’t frightened but once we knew it was a bomb we were very cautious.

“I called police who came in 20 minutes. And then they contacted the bomb squad who came from the Ministry of Defence. The bomb squad came and the bomb was detonated at around 4pm.
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