Tag Archives: archaeology

Early Anglo-Saxon Coins by Gareth Williams, Shire Archaeology

Early Anglo-Saxon Coins by Gareth Williams
Early Anglo-Saxon Coins by Gareth Williams, Shire Archaeology

I recently picked up a copy of Early Anglo-Saxon Coins by Gareth Williams, published by Shire Archaeology. This is one of the ‘new and improved’ Shire Archaeology series, sporting not only the modernized cover design, but a great many photographs accompany the text and the great thing about those photographs is that they are all in colour!

The book will be of limited value for identifying Anglo-Saxon coins (although there are many colour images of Anglo-Saxon coins and you may get lucky) – a guide to identifying Anglo-Saxon coins was not the authors intent, rather, this book is the story behind those coins and how they came to be here in the United Kingdom.

I hope all of the new look Shire Archaeology publications are produced to this standard, the production values and all the colour photographs are wonderful! When I get time I will write a full review of this book for the main website, in the mean time, I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the Anglo-Saxons or Anglo-Saxon coinage, a must read for metal detectorists and coin collectors everywhere.

The cover image is a hoard of Anglo-Saxon silver pennies, buried around 730AD, found at Woodham Walter in Essex.

Buy on Amazon.co.uk

Early Anglo-Saxon Coins (Shire Archaeology)

Buy on Amazon.com

Early Anglo-Saxon Coins (Shire Archaeology)

Dry weather reveals archaeological ‘cropmarks’ in fields

Dry weather reveals archaeological ‘cropmarks’ in fields

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11128297

Hundreds of ancient sites have been discovered by aerial surveys, thanks to a dry start to the summer, English Heritage has said.

The surveys show marks made when crops growing over buried features develop at a different rate from those nearby.

The newly-discovered Roman and prehistoric settlements include a site near Bradford Abbas, Dorset.

The Roman camp was revealed in June after three sides became visible in rain-parched fields of barley.

The lightly-built defensive enclosure would have provided basic protection for Roman soldiers while on manoeuvres in the first century AD and is one of only four discovered in the south west of England, English Heritage said.

The dry conditions also allowed well-known sites to be photographed in greater detail.

[More at the BBC website.]

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