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Metal Detecting UK Home > Famous Treasure Wrecks, Spanish Galleons > Wreck of the Halsewell

The Wreck of the Halsewell, Seadart Divers Association

The site where East Indiaman The Halsewell met her end on January 6th, 1786. Image � Seadart Divers Association.

Above: The site where East Indiaman The Halsewell met her end on January 6th, 1786. Image � Seadart Divers Association.

The wreck of the Halsewell lies 3 miles west of the Swanage Lighthouse, between St. Albans Head and Anvil Point, in 1 to 10 metres of water. Due to having been wrecked against cliffs, the ship would have been smashed to pieces (in both the original storm and in every storm since 1786) and the artefacts and cargo it was carrying were probably scattered over a large area.

Salvage boat Cave Cave over the Halsewell wreck site, near Swanage � Seadart Divers Association

Above: Seadart Salvage boat Cave Cave over the Halsewell wreck site, near Swanage. Image � Seadart Divers Association.

Seadart Diver Chris uses an air filled lift bag to move boulders off the Halsewell wreck site. Image � Seadart Divers Association

Above: Seadart Diver Chris uses an air filled lift bag to move boulders off the Halsewell wreck site. Image � Seadart Divers Association.

The Seadart divers report that the wreck site is covered in boulders, which makes recovery of material from ship particularly difficult and time consuming. The Seadart salvage team use Acrow props and hydraulic jacks to support the rocks and boulders that are too heavy move so that they can excavate under and around them safely.

Seadart salvage diver Bob working under an overhang on the Halsewell wreck site. Image � Seadart Divers Association

Above: Seadart salvage diver Bob working under an overhang on the Halsewell wreck site. Image � Seadart Divers Association.

Spanish 8 Reale solid silver coin from the Halsewell wreck siteGeorge III solid gold Half Guinea from the Halsewell wreck site

Above left: Spanish 8 Reale solid silver coin. Above right: George III solid gold Half Guinea. Both from the Halsewell wreck site. Images � Seadart Divers Association.

External Links

Seadart Divers Association Official Web Site

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