Tag Archives: gold

Celtic gold coins found whilst volunteering for an archaeological unit

Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus, king of the Catuvellauni tribe

Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.
Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.

Celtic gold stater (right) and quarter stater (left) of Tasciovanus, king of the Catuvellauni tribe (from around 20BC until around 9AD) and father of Cunobelin, that I found whilst volunteering for an archaeological unit. Equipment used was a Compass Coin Pro II metal detector and a massive yellow JCB in place of my usual Black ADA. These photos turned out pretty well considering they were taken on the cover of one of my finds log books that was sitting on the boot of the presiding archaeologists car!

Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.
Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.

Payment received by me for these two rare gold coins? £0.00p. If they were acquired by a museum after the Treasure Act inquest (I was not told what happened to the coins after that point) at St Albans Coroners Court, they certainly got a bargain! The FLO who attended the inquest as expert witness certainly seemed impressed. They are certainly among my all time favourite metal detecting finds! Celtic gold coins found whilst volunteering for an archaeological unit forum thread.
Celtic gold stater of Tasciovanus

Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.
Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.
Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.
Celtic gold staters of Tasciovanus. Celtic gold coins.

Celtic gold quarter stater of Tasciovanus

Celtic gold quarter stater of Tasciovanus

Metal Detecting UK

Dallinghoo/Wickham Market Hoard – metal detecting find fund-raising

Metal detecting find fund-raising – The Dallinghoo/Wickham Market Hoard

Dallinghoo/Wickham Market Hoard, 840 Iron Age gold staters of the Iceni tribe, found by metal detectorists in 2008.
Dallinghoo/Wickham Market Hoard, 840 Iron Age gold staters of the Iceni tribe, found by metal detectorists in 2008. Photograph courtesy of the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

Colchester and Ipswich Museum Service have apparently begun a fund raising effort to secure the Dallinghoo/Wickham Market Hoard of 840 Iron Age gold staters found by two metal detectorists in 2008. The Dallinghoo/Wickham Market Hoard is one of the largest hoards of iron age gold staters ever discovered. The 840 gold staters date from around 40 BC–15 AD.

This metal detecting find received a fair bit of coverage in the news after a very public falling out between the two finders, Michael Darke (or Dark, depending on source) and Keith Lewis.

The BBC reports that Colchester and Ipswich Museum Service hope to display this fantastic metal detecting find at Ipswich Museum, but I have not been able to find any details or information about the fund-raising effort on their various web sites as yet, so if you want to support the campaign to keep this find in Essex, you could try getting in touch with Ipswich Museum directly:

Ipswich Museum
High Street
Ipswich IP1 3QH

Tel: 01473 433550
Fax: 01473 433558 [Wow, people still use faxes? wtf?]

I’ll update if an online fund-raising campaign is launched.

‘Treasure house’ of the North Thames tribes discovered – largest find of Iron Age gold in UK history

‘Treasure house’ of the North Thames tribes discovered – largest find of Iron Age gold in UK history

Metal detectorists in Hertfordshire discover the ‘Treasure house’ of the North Thames tribes – the single largest find of Iron Age gold in history. Found just outside St. Albans, the hoard of 52,504 gold staters and over 200 neck torcs is set to re-write the history books.

A group of archaeologists called in to excavate the find videoed the recovery of what has been called ‘the most stunning metal detecting find in history’ and are releasing the tapes on YouTube:

'Treasure house' of the North Thames tribes discovered

Expect to see plenty about this incredible discovery on the news all day today!

Metal Detecting UK

Interesting British Museum document on the analysis of the Coenwulf Mancus

The analysis of the Coenwulf Mancus

Analysis of a gold mancus of Coenwulf of Mercia and other comparable coins by Gareth Williams and Michael Cowell [PDF]

This very interesting document describes not only the Coenwulf Mancus and the various processes the British Museum used to examine and authenticate it, but also shows the other six ‘later’ Anglo-Saxon gold coins in the British Museum’s collection. There are only eight known ‘later’ Anglo-Saxon gold coins in existence, seven held at the BM and number eight is in a museum in France, or Belgium or somewhere, can’t remember.

Also, there was a great photo of a Coenwulf silver penny on page 37 of the November issue of The Searcher.

Metal Detecting UK

Treasure stuff from Dio Cassius – Roman Gold Rings

“As the Boii and the rest of the Gauls were continually offering for sale many articles and an especially large number of captives, the Romans became afraid that they might some day use the money against them, and accordingly forbade everybody to give to a Gaul either silver or gold coin.”

“The matter of the gold rings is as follows. Of the ancient Romans no one,—not to mention such as had once been slaves,—who had grown up as a free citizen even, was allowed to wear gold rings, save senators and knights,—as has been stated. Therefore they are given to those freedmen whom the man in power may select; although they may use gold in other ways, this is still an additional honor and distinguishes them as superior, or as capable, through having been freed, of becoming knights.”

“In this way Dacia became subject to Rome and Trajan founded cities there. The treasures of Decebalus were also discovered, though hidden beneath the Sargetia river, which ran past his palace. He had made some captives divert the course of the river and had then excavated its bed. There he had placed a large amount of silver and of gold and other objects of great value, that could endure some moisture, had heaped stones over them and piled on earth. After that he had let the river flow over them. The same captives were compelled to deposit his robes and other similar objects in neighboring caves; and when he had effected this, he made away with them to prevent their talking. But Bicilis, a comrade of his, who knew what had been done, was seized and gave this information.”

From the books of Dio Cassius on Project Gutenberg.

Precious Rocks, Gems and Minerals Magazine Partwork, Sample of Spanish Gold

A new partwork, called Precious Rocks, Gems and Minerals, caught my eye at the news agents today. On the cover, a small bottle containing pieces of gold leaf: Precious Rocks, Gems and Minerals Magazine Partwork, Sample of Spanish Gold
The gold in the bottle was mined at Spain’s Rio Tinto mines, where the Roman empire mined a great deal of its gold. I find it fascinating that this tiny sample of Spanish gold has its origin in the same gold bearing rocks that Romans mined to make their gold coins and artifacts!

This is the first issue of this new partwork and is available from news agents at the introductory price of 99p, the usual price being £4.99. Looks like it is going to be a great magazine for aspiring rockhounds, as each issue contains a different rock, gem or mineral sample.

Apologies for the terrible photograph, just a quick snap for now. The clear bottle containing clear liquid suspending small pieces of highly reflective spanish gold proved a tricky target for my digital camera’s auto-focus! I’ll add a better snap when I set up my mini studio and can light it better.

Metal Detecting Clubs in the USA and Canada

Metal Detecting Clubs in the USA and Canada

By popular demand I have added lists of metal detecting clubs in the US and Canada:

Metal Detecting Clubs in the US

Metal Detecting Clubs in Canada

If you want your metal detecting club to be added to one of the above lists drop me and email at the usual address, or leave a comment here or on the forum and I’ll get in touch.

My next task is to compile lists of gold prospecting clubs, if you know of any or would like your club on the list, let me know!

Half a Million Dollar Gold Bar Stolen From Mel Fisher Museum

Half a Million Dollar Gold Bar Stolen From Mel Fisher Museum

A 75 ounce gold bar, salvaged from the wreck of the spanish galleon Santa Margarita by treasure hunter Mel Fisher, has been stolen from the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum in Key West, Florida. Police are searching for two suspects caught on the museum’s CCTV cameras.

A $10,000 reward is being offered for the safe return of the gold bar, estimated to be worth $550,000.

The Santa Margarita was wrecked in a storm off the Florida coast in 1622, along with her far more famous sister ship the Atocha.

Video about the theft at CNN.

Metal Detecting UK