Tag Archives: silver

Captain Kidd’s Treasure is a Big Lump of Lead

Captain Kidd’s treasure turns out to be a bar of lead!

Back in May we reported on the discovery of a 50kg (110lb) silver bar, recovered from what was believed to be the wreck of Captain William Kidd’s ship, the Adventure Galley, off the coast of Madagascar. The press quickly jumped on the story, claiming Captain Kidd’s treasure had been discovered.

Portrait of Captain William Kidd, captain kidd's treasure found in Madagascar?
Portrait of Captain William Kidd

The United Nations have released a statement saying that the wreck is not Captain William Kidd’s ship and the ‘silver bar’ is, in fact, 95% lead:

“The mission showed that several historic wrecks lie indeed in the bays of Sainte-Marie island,”

“However, what had been identified as the Adventure Galley of the pirate Captain Kidd has been found by the experts… to be a broken part of the Sainte-Marie port constructions.”

More on the BBC web site.

I have set up a forum thread to discuss this find, please comment on this story here or on the forum!

Follow us on twitter for the latest news on this and other treasure finds!

The BBC Reports Captain Kidd’s treasure found in Madagascar

Captain Kidd’s treasure found in Madagascar?

The BBC is reporting that Captain Kidd’s treasure may have been found off the coast of Madagascar. What has actually been found is a single large  50 kilogram silver bar, believed to have originated in 17th Century Bolivia.

Portrait of Captain William Kidd, Captain Kidd's treasure found
Portrait of Captain William Kidd

Famed underwater explorer Barry Clifford believes the silver bar came from the wreck of Captain William Kidd’s (executed for piracy in London in 1701) ship.

Captain William Kidd after being executed in 1701. Captain Kidd's treasure found
Captain William Kidd after being executed in 1701.

Forensic tests will be made on timbers from the ship to see if it originated in England.

I have set up a forum thread to discuss this find, please comment on this story here or on the forum!

Follow us on twitter for the latest news on this and other treasure finds!

Roman Silver Leda mirror from the Boscoreale treasure

Roman Silver Leda mirror from the Boscoreale treasure

Roman first century silver Leda mirror from the Boscoreale treasure, photo courtesy of the Louvre.
Roman first century silver Leda mirror from the Boscoreale treasure, photo courtesy of the Louvre.

Another superb piece of roman silversmithing – the Leda and the Swan mirror from the Boscoreale treasure. This piece dates from the first century AD and was found in the remains of the Boscoreale Villa, a high status dwelling just outside Pompeii, that was destroyed in 79AD by the eruption of mount Vesuvius.

Silver cup with Athena seated from the Hildesheim Treasure

Probably the finest known example of the Roman silversmith’s art:

Silver cup with Athena seated from the Hildesheim Treasure. Photograph by Andreas Praefcke from Wikipedia
Silver cup with Athena seated from the Hildesheim Treasure. Photograph by Andreas Praefcke from Wikipedia

Silver cup with Athena seated from the Hildesheim treasure, discovered on October 17, 1868 on Galgenberg Hill in Hildesheim, Germany. Dating from the first century AD, this cup may have been owned and used by the commander of the lost Varus legions.

Interesting British Museum document on the analysis of the Coenwulf Mancus

The analysis of the Coenwulf Mancus

Analysis of a gold mancus of Coenwulf of Mercia and other comparable coins by Gareth Williams and Michael Cowell [PDF]

This very interesting document describes not only the Coenwulf Mancus and the various processes the British Museum used to examine and authenticate it, but also shows the other six ‘later’ Anglo-Saxon gold coins in the British Museum’s collection. There are only eight known ‘later’ Anglo-Saxon gold coins in existence, seven held at the BM and number eight is in a museum in France, or Belgium or somewhere, can’t remember.

Also, there was a great photo of a Coenwulf silver penny on page 37 of the November issue of The Searcher.

Metal Detecting UK

Alan Turing’s Silver Bars – Story From an Old Issue of Treasure Hunting?

Alan Turing’s Silver Bars – Story From an Old Issue of Treasure Hunting?

Anybody remember this story?

Alan Turing, the genius who cracked the German Enigma coding machines, was said to have converted all of his money into silver bars and then concealed them somewhere in Bletchley Park. At the end of the war, Turing returned to dig up his hoard using the map he had drawn when he buried the silver bars several years earlier, try as he might, he was never able to relocate them.

It seems a pretty unlikely story, but nevertheless, I am trying to find out where and when the story was originally published. I am pretty sure it appeared in an old issue of Treasure Hunting Magazine, but does anybody know which one?

Metal Detecting UK

Photographing metal detecting finds with a cheap digital microscope, Part II

A couple more shots with the cheap, perhaps too cheap, digital microscope. Roman coin of Gallienus:Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus - 218 – 268Roman coins picturing mythical creatures are among my favourite finds, so I’m glad this one came out pretty well!Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus - 218 – 268Not bad!

Now for a hammered silver:

Hammered Silver photographed with a cheap digital microscopeHammered Silver photographed with a cheap digital microscopeNot bad going! I was searching around on the web last night and found that Lindner (the coin and stamp storage box people) make a digital microscope that is similar in design to the one I am using but looks a lot better made, not to mention being a lot more expensive. Might be worth trying out some time!

Update: I’ve just heard from The Searcher Magazine that they reviewed the Lindner digital microscope in the August 2008 issue, on page 20.

Viking silver ingot found on Isle of Man declared as treasure

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/isleofman/hi/people_and_places/newsid_8995000/8995795.stm

A viking silver ingot weighing 20 grams has been declared treasure on the Isle of Man. The silver ingot was found by John Crowe in October 2009, in a field in Andreas.

(With thanks to  TheSearcherMag, who posted this story on twitter)